The Antikythera Mechanism: A Masterpiece of Ancient Astronomy and Engineering

Date/Time
Date(s) - 03/14/17
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Hosted by
Adler Planetarium


The Antikythera Mechanism: A Masterpiece of Ancient Astronomy and Engineering

Adler Planetarium

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
7:00–8:30 pm Lecture + Q&A
8:30–9:00 pm Public Reception with the speaker

The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient Greek gear-work astronomical model and computing machine. Probably built within a few decades of 200 BCE, it tracked time in two different calendars and displayed the changing positions of the Sun and Moon in the zodiac as well as the Moon’s phases. And it predicted solar and lunar eclipses. Most likely, it also simulated the motions of the planets.

This talk will explain our current understanding of the Antikythera mechanism, with emphasis on its relationship to several aspects of Greek culture, including science, philosophy and art.  Who might have built such a thing and why?

Tickets are free, but reservations are required.

James Evans is a historian of astronomy and the author of The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy. He is director of the program in Science, Technology and Society at the University of Puget Sound and the editor of the Journal for the History of Astronomy.

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6618