One Day University with the Chicago Tribune

Date/Time
Date(s) - 05/06/17
9:30 am - 4:15 pm

Location
Athenaeum Theatre

Hosted by
One Day University


One Day University with the Chicago Tribune

May 06, 2017 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

Is that Really Art? Understanding and Appreciating Modern Painting Tina Rivers Ryan / Metropolitan Museum of Art

Here’s a question that all art lovers today have had to ask themselves: How do you look at a painting of a woman made of geometric shapes and shadows? What about a canvas painted a single, solid color? Or covered in paint drips? Or printed with a photographic image? Do any of these really count as “art,” let alone as “paintings?” And how do you know which ones are “good?”

The key to answering these questions is to understand that modern art is a conversation, a dialogue between artists about the very nature of art that has been going on for generations. In this talk, we will look closely at four paintings, culled from the movements of Cubism, Constructivism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop, in order to understand how artists in different times and places have explored these fundamental issues in their work. After learning to look at these modern works, we will consider whether this conversation is still unfolding: are we still making “modern” art, or did modernism end, giving way to something altogether different?

Tina Rivers Ryan / Metropolitan Museum of Art
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan holds a BA from Harvard, three Master’s Degrees, and a PhD from Columbia. She has taught classes on art at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history, “Art Humanities: Masterpieces of Western Art.” Her scholarly writing and art criticism have appeared in the notable periodicals Artforum, Art in America, and Art Journal, and her work has been commissioned by museums such as the Walker Art Center and Tate Modern. She regularly lectures on art to both public and academic audiences internationally. In 2015, she joined the curatorial staff of the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
The Supreme Court: What’s Next and Why it Matters Alison Gash / University of Oregon

Few at the Founding could have ever imagined the Supreme Court becoming one of the most powerful policymaking institutions in the United States. Yet today, the Court has the power to sidestep public opinion, upend federal legislation, constrain state governance and even bring down the President. Professor Alison Gash will take us back to the Court’s humble beginnings, charting how the Court amassed its power under Justice Marshall’s leadership. Professor Gash will introduce us to the Court’s struggles under pre-and post-Reconstruction racial apartheid, its skirmishes with legislative and executive power during the New Deal era, and its foray into areas of privacy, intimacy and expression.

As we walk through the Court’s history, meandering through landmark decisions, Professor Gash will use her research on law and social policy to highlight the importance of understanding the Court not only as a legal actor but also as a significant source of policy innovation and paralysis. Through this lens, Professor Gash will demonstrate why the Court’s makeup–its personalities and its relationships–can make or break American public policy.

Alison Gash / University of Oregon
Alison Gash is a political science professor at the University of Oregon, where she has received several fellowships and grants for her teaching. She specializes in US Supreme Court and civil rights laws. Professor Gash has also taught at Berkeley, where she received the Commendation for Excellence in Teaching two years in a row. She is the author of “Below the Radar: How Silence Can Save Civil Rights.” Her work has appeared in Newsweek, Slate, Politico, and Washington Monthly.

12:15 PM – 1:30 PM
Lunch Break 1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

1:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Five Turning Points That Changed American History Edward O’Donnell / Holy Cross College

In the relatively short history of the United States, there have been many turning points and landmark movements that irrevocably altered the direction of the nation and signaled the dramatic start of a new historical reality. Some took the form of groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts; some were dramatic military victories and defeats. Still others were nationwide social and religious movements, or technological and scientific innovations.

What all of these turning points had in common, is that they forever changed the character of America. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades. Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood.

Edward O’Donnell / Holy Cross College
Edward O’Donnell is a professor of History at Holy Cross College. He is the author of several books, including “Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality: Progress and Poverty in the Gilded Age.” He frequently contributes op-eds to publications like Newsweek and the Huffington Post. He has been featured on PBS, the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, and C-SPAN. O’Donnell also has curated several major museum exhibits on American history and appeared in several historical documentaries. He currently hosts a history podcast, In The Past Lane.

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM
The Science of Stress and Sleep: How they Effect Creativity, Concentration, and Memory Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

What’s going on in your head while you sleep? The research of Notre Dame Professor Jessica Payne shows that the non-waking hours are incredibly valuable for your day-to-day life, especially for helping to commit information to memory and for problem solving. If you ever thought sleep was just downtime between one task and the next, think again.The fact is, your brain pulls an all-nighter when you hit the hay. Many regions of the brain – especially those involved in learning, processing information, and emotion – are actually more active during sleep than when you’re awake. These regions are working together while you sleep, helping you process and sort information you’ve taken in during the course of the day. Professor Payne’s research has focused on what types of information are submitted to memory, and has been instrumental in better understanding how the brain stores the information.

Sound interesting? It is. And useful too, as Professor Payne will outline all sorts of practical information on how to control your sleep habits to insure maximum productivity.

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame
Jessica Payne is the Nancy O’Neill Collegiate Chair and Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, where she directs the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab. Her course, The Sleeping Brain, routinely sports a waitlist because of its immense popularity among Notre Dame students. In 2012, Professor Payne received the Frank O’Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award. She is also a two-time recipient of the Distinction in Teaching Award, and won the Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard University’s Derek Bok Center.

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