Education Reform: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Date/Time
Date(s) - 03/14/18
3:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Location
The Heartland Institute

Hosted by
Heartland Institute


Education Reform: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Heartland Institute

Wednesday March 14, 2018 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

Vicki Alger, Independent Institute research fellow and contributor to The Heartland Institute’s The Patriot’s Toolbox, will present a convincing case for commonsensical education reform.

Wednesday
March 14, 2018
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
The Heartland Institute
3939 N. Wilke
Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004

Education has always been a high priority for Americans. The Founding Fathers knew a free society would be impossible without an educated population. According to Thomas Jefferson, “An educated citizenry is a vital requisite for our survival as a free people.”

During America’s first century, most schooling was done at home or in small schools run by civil institutions, such as churches or private societies. Early in the Progressive Era, however, state governments gradually took over responsibility for providing elementary and secondary schooling.

While private schools continue to operate today, about nine out of every 10 students in the United States attend schools that are owned, operated, and staffed by government employees. About 70 percent of the teachers in those schools belong to unions, working under workplace rules that frustrate the best and brightest while protecting incompetent and even dangerous teachers.

Why do public schools fail to satisfy so many parents? Why do American students perform poorly compared with their peers in other developed countries?

Come to The Heartland Institute for a sensible discussion on these and other education issues. At this event, Vicki Alger, Independent Institute research fellow and contributor to The Heartland Institute’s The Patriot’s Toolbox, will present a convincing case for commonsensical education reform.

Vicki Alger is the co-author of The Patriot’s Toolbox chapter on elementary and secondary education policy. During her presentation, Alger will discuss 10 of the most important education policy principles, including:

1)    The rising tide of mediocrity.

2)    Common Core was not the answer.

3)    Allow parents to choose.

4)    School choice programs work.

5)    Avoid new regulations.

6)    School choice benefits teachers.

7)    Design guidelines for voucher programs.

8)    Design guidelines for ESAs.

9)    Design guidelines for charter schools.

10)  Digital learning: The future of education.

 

If you’re concerned about the decline of education in America, come to The Heartland Institute on March 14 for a review of the reforms that work best and why they will fix America’s broken public education system.

REGISTER HERE

 

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